African Americans during the Civil War

A valuable picture of a white man and his slave during the Civil War.

During the Civil War African Americans were discriminated against and not allowed to fight for the Confederate army. They served the confederacy as servants and they cooked, cleaned, and maintained the camp. One reason they were not allowed into the army was, “This is a government of white men, made by white men for white men, to be administered, protected and maintained by white men.” (Democratic Congressman 1863) It was believed that only white men should fight because they had all the rights and they were the dominant race. Also, Frederick Douglass said, “Once let the black man get upon his person the brass letters, US; let him get an eagle on his button, and a musket on his soldier and bullets in his pocket, and there is no power on earth which can deny that he has earned the right to citizenship.”He was saying that if the Confederacy allowed African Americans to fight they are allowing them to be citizens and have equal rights. In order to gain advancement African Americans had to submit to some discrimination and that is ok. An example of this is how after losing the war the south needed a way to justify their actions so they told the story that their slaves were loyal and loved them so much that they fought in the war for the confederates. Slaves allowed them tell this story so whites would let them gain their freedom. If African Americans did not allow the white people to discriminate and tell the story they would not have been able to advance or gain their freedom. It was not better for African Americans to reject discrimination because it could end up furthering their rights.

 Image URl: http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2013/09/24/opinion/24disunion-img/24disunion-img-blog427.jpg

Sources:

MacPherson, James. Ordeal by Fire. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2000.

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